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Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition

Printiable PDF of Course Overview

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Welcome to the 2008 – 2009 school year at Jericho High School! This Advanced Placement Literature and Composition course is designed to be a college level course.  This course will provide you with the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university English literature course. We will read and study works from various genres, such as poetry, short stories, novels, and plays. Some of the literary works we will read this year include: The Stranger, The Sun Also Rises, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hamlet, Frankenstein, and Oedipus Rex. In conjunction with the literature we read, we will also master our writing skills. As a student in this class, you will be expected to read and write often and to be a positive contributing member during class sessions. Please read the following expectations carefully to help ensure your success in the upcoming year. Keep this as the first page of your binder.

REQUIRED MATERIALS

You are expected to bring the following materials to class every day:

  1. Pens, highlighters, index cards, and Post-It notes, the highlighters and Post-It notes should be in the following colors if possible: pink, yellow, green, blue, and orange.
  2. Three ring binder with plenty of loose-leaf paper divided into the following sections:

     3. Textbook or other reading material

CLASS BEHAVIOR / PARTICIPATION

Participation in discussion and class activities is an integral part of this course and has a significant impact on your grade. Your responsibilities in this class are:

  1. To attend class regularly (at least 90% of the time)
  2. To attend class on time
  3. To be prepared for class, including completing all reading and homework assignments
  4. To meet deadlines (late work, if excepted at all, will significantly lower your grade)
  5. To ask questions when you don’t understand
  6. To avoid eating and drinking in class
  7. To never use your cell phone, IPod, or other electronic devices in class

GRADING POLICY

Keep all graded papers and handouts in your English binder for reference. Your grade each marking period is based on the following:

  1. Class participation, behavior, and preparation
  2. Homework, which will be assigned each day and written on the board (if you are absent you will find the assignment on the class website)
  3. Tests and quizzes (including the occasional pop quiz)
  4. Essay assignments, take-home projects, and your writing portfolio
  5. Class work, in-class projects, and group work

The Nuts and Bolts of Knowledge Needed for the AP Test

Printiable PDF of Nuts and Bolts

I- Diction

a. monosyllabic / polysyllabic

b. colloquial / informal / formal / old fashioned / slang

c. denotative / connotative

d. euphonious / cacophonous

e. concrete / abstract

f. jargon / dialect

 

II- Syntax

a. sentence length

b. sentence pattern

c. arrangement of ideas in a sentence

d. arrangement of ideas in a paragraph

 

III- Treatment of Subject Matter

a. subjectivity

b. objectivity

c. support of main idea

 

IV- Figurative Language (how an author conveys meaning)

a. alliteration: the repetition of initial syllable sounds

b. assonance: the repetition of vowel sounds

c. consonance: the repetition of consonance sounds

d. simile: comparing two unlike things using the words like or as

e. metaphor: comparing two unlike things

f. personification: giving inanimate objects human qualities

g. onomatopoeia: words that imitate the sound they are expressing, example: pop, sizzle, buzz

h. hyperbole: exaggeration

i. understatement (meiosis, litotes)

j. paradox: a seemingly contradictory statement that may in fact be true

k. oxymoron: contradictory statement

l. pun: a play on words or phrases

m. irony: the opposite of what is expected

n. sarcasm: harsh or bitter derision or irony

o. antithesis: the direct opposite

p. apostrophe: an address to someone who is not present or to a personified object or idea

q. allusion: a reference to something else, a work of literature, the Bible, Greek Mythology, etc.

r. metonymy: A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is

closely associated (i.e.- scepter for sovereignty or the bottle for strong drink)

s. figure of speech: common saying

t. flashback: an event or scene that is inserted out of chronological order

u. foreshadowing: hints as to what will happen lately

v. imagery: the use of one or more of the five senses to describe something

w. mood: the atmosphere or feeling in a literary work

x. narration

y. plot: the series of events in a literary work

z. point of view: the type of narration, usually 1st or 3rd person, omniscient narration is all knowing

aa. protagonist: main character

bb. rhyme (end / slant / internal / rhyme scheme)

cc. setting: time and place

dd. Structure: shape and form

ee. Style

ff. suspense

gg. symbol: an object that stands for an idea

hh. theme: central idea

ii. allegory: the use of symbolic characters to tell a moral tale

 

V- Point of View

a. participant (first person)—I, me, my, we, us, our

b. non-participant (third person)—he, him, her, she, they, them

c. second person (participant or non-participant)—you, your, yourself

 

VI- Archetypes

a. character archetypes

b. symbolic archetypes

c. situational archetypes

 

VII- Allusion

a. personal

b. biblical

c. mythological

d. historical

e. literary to literary

 

VIII- Themes

Abuse / neglect

Alienation

Ambition

Appearance vs reality

Betrayal

Bureaucracy

Children

Courage / cowardice

Chance / fate / luck

Cruelty / violence

Custom / tradition

Defeat / failure

Despair / discontent / disillusionment

Dreams / fantasies

Domination / suppression

Duty / allegiance / blind faith

Escape / confinement

Ethic vs morality / right vs wrong

Exile / persecution

Falsity / pretense / affectation

Family / parenthood / deconstructed family

Gender evolution

The isms (prejudices: sexism, racism, classism, anti-

Semitism, sizism, ageism, lookism)

Deconstructed family

Free will / will power

Greed

Heaven / paradise / utopia

Home

Heart vs. reason

Initiation

Illusion / innocence

Instinct

Journey

Law / justice / revenge

Education / school

Loneliness / alienation

Materialism

Memory / past

Mob psychology

Mysterious danger

Nature vs. mechanistic world

Persistence / perseverance

Patriotism

Poverty / class

Prophecy

Redemption / salvation

Repentance

Resistance / rebellion

Revenge / retribution

Ritual / ceremony

Scapegoat / victim / suicide

Media

Search for self

Time

War

 

***A thematic statement = elevated diction + comment

on book

 

IX- Characterization (POV / narrator)

What or where characters… say, do, think, wear, are; with whom they associate, what others say about them

 

 

X- Analyzing Tragedy and Tragic Fiction

Aristolian Theory:

unity of action

catharsis

tragedy (hubris)

scene of suffering

 

XI- Tone (feeling/mood/attitude/effect)

Lighthearted

Confident

Amused

Complementary

Hopeful

Cheery

Elated

Passionate

Exuberant

Optimistic

Sympathetic

Proud

Enthusiastic

Loving

Compassionate

Indignant

Foreboding

Reverent

Irreverent

Diffident

Contemptuous

Angry

Furious

Irritated

Accusing

Disgusted

Indignant

Condemnatory

Outraged

Bitter

Threatening

Inflammatory

Disdainful

Formal

Ceremonial

Restrained

Detached

Objective

Informative

Candid

Clinical

Objective

Questioning

Instructive

Matter-of-fact

Admonitory

Learned factual

Didactic

Informative

Authoritative

Incredulous

Shocked

Baffled

Disbelieving

Urgent

Nostalgic

Reminiscent

Sentimental

Whimsical

Fanciful

Scornful

Sarcastic

Critical

Satiric

Bantering

Taunting

Ironic

Amused

Patronizing

Pompous

Disdainful

Cynical

Facetious

Sardonic

Insolent

Flippant

Condescending

Mock-heroic

Whimsical

Melancholic

Mournful

Apprehensive

Despairing

Foreboding

Resigned

Elegiac

Sentimental

Didactic

Pedantic

Disturbed

Serious

Fearful

Sober

Staid

Somber

Sad

Solemn

Concerned

Gloomy

Hopeless


TP-CASTT

A Way to Identify Poetic Devices

T-TITLE: ponder the title before reading the poem

P-PARAPHRASE: translate the poem for meaning beyond the literal and into your own words

C-CONNOTATION: contemplate the poem for meaning beyond the literal

A-ATTITUDE: observe both the speaker’s and poet’s attitude (tone)

S-SHIFTS: note shifts in speaker’s and poet’s attitude

T-TITLE: examine the title again—this time on an interpretive level

T-THEME: determine what the poet is saying

 

 

DIDLS

A Way to Understand Poetry Through the Examination of the Author’s Tone or Attitude Towards the Subject

 

D-DICTION: the connotation of word choice

I-IMAGES: vivid appeals to understanding through the senses

D-DETAILS: facts included or omitted

L-LANGUAGE: overall use of language such as formal, jargon, clinical…

S-SENTENCE STRUCTURE: how structure effects the reader’s attitude